Why is my crypto transaction 'unconfirmed'?

Can someone tell me why my transaction is still unconfirmed? /r/Bitcoin

Can someone tell me why my transaction is still unconfirmed? /Bitcoin submitted by cryptoanalyticabot to cryptoall [link] [comments]

Can someone tell me why my transaction is still unconfirmed? /r/Bitcoin

Can someone tell me why my transaction is still unconfirmed? /Bitcoin submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Why is my transaction unconfirmed after 11 hours? /r/Bitcoin

Why is my transaction unconfirmed after 11 hours? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

12-13 13:51 - 'Why is my unconfirmed transaction not dropped after 3 days?' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/ts2fe removed from /r/Bitcoin within 3-13min

'''
I did the transaction on the 9th of December, it's been over 72 hours and it still hasn't dropped. The fee is 23 sat/B, how long do i have to wait to get my bitcoin back?
'''
Why is my unconfirmed transaction not dropped after 3 days?
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: ts2fe
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Why is my unconfirmed transaction not dropped after 3 days? /r/Bitcoin

Why is my unconfirmed transaction not dropped after 3 days? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Even my transaction with a decent fee is still stuck as unconfirmed, any experts now why? TID:https://btc.com/48bea43258dceccdc4d4f3ce3aa669b02f0d5c90c99d4c825a8c8ca75772c5da /r/Bitcoin

Even my transaction with a decent fee is still stuck as unconfirmed, any experts now why? TID:https://btc.com/48bea43258dceccdc4d4f3ce3aa669b02f0d5c90c99d4c825a8c8ca75772c5da /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

08-14 16:32 - '7 hours and my transaction is still "unconfirmed" - why is that so?' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/AnythingForSuccess removed from /r/Bitcoin within 64-74min

'''
Can someone please explain why the transaction I sent from hardware wallet to an online wallet still shows up as "unconfirmed" despite 7 hours have passed?
I don't understand. Shouldn't Bitcoin be faster now? I indicated a low fee, but still.
There are currently 51k unconfirmed transactions: [link]1
I thought this had to be fixed now?
Am I missing something?
'''
7 hours and my transaction is still "unconfirmed" - why is that so?
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: AnythingForSuccess
1: blo*kchain*info/u**o*fir*ed-*ra***ctions
Unknown links are censored to prevent spreading illicit content.
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

7 hours and my transaction is still "unconfirmed" - why is that so? /r/Bitcoin

7 hours and my transaction is still submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

08-14 15:22 - '7 hours and my transaction is still "unconfirmed" - why is that so?' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/AnythingForSuccess removed from /r/Bitcoin within 0-4min

'''
Can someone please explain why the transaction I sent from hardware wallet to an online wallet still shows up as "unconfirmed" despite 7 hours have passed?
I don't understand. Shouldn't Bitcoin be faster now? I indicated a low fee, but still.
There are currently 51k unconfirmed transactions: [link]1
I thought this had to be fixed now?
Am I missing something?
'''
7 hours and my transaction is still "unconfirmed" - why is that so?
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: AnythingForSuccess
1: blo*kchain***fo/un*o*firme*-tra***ctions
Unknown links are censored to prevent spreading illicit content.
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

ELI5 why my bitcoin transaction is still unconfirmed /r/Bitcoin

ELI5 why my bitcoin transaction is still unconfirmed /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Why is my transaction stuck unconfirmed? /r/Bitcoin

Why is my transaction stuck unconfirmed? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

01-01 10:54 - 'Why is my transaction still unconfirmed?' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/ohsnapitsjaycee removed from /r/Bitcoin within 6568-6573min

'''
It's been almost 20 hours and this one transaction that is sent to my account is still unconfirmed [link]1 Could anyone know why? Thank you
'''
Why is my transaction still unconfirmed?
Go1dfish undelete link
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Author: ohsnapitsjaycee
1: *l*ckcha****nfo*tx/e01*7b*77331*1395961d*4a**be25*1095e5**41a**b95d76b1d*b*24*7f008
Unknown links are censored to prevent spreading illicit content.
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Why is my transaction still unconfirmed? /r/Bitcoin

Why is my transaction still unconfirmed? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

HELP... Why is my transaction unconfirmed? /r/Bitcoin

HELP... Why is my transaction unconfirmed? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Instacoin UK - Last Chance (up to end of Oct) to get a free £10 worth of Bitcoin (same day) for £100 Bitcoin purchase

Instacoin UK , a popular cryptocurrency exchange, are updating their referral scheme from 1st November 2020. The referral amount will be adjusted to a £5 bonus for any purchase over £50. Currently it is a £10 bonus for any purchase of £100 or over.
Instacoin UK is a website which allows you to purchase Bitcoin with your Visa / MasterCard or via a bank transfer. They have been around a while used by lots of beermoneyuk users already.
Instacoin UK are going to honor the £10 bonus scheme for any new customer signing that sign up and purchase £100 of Bitcoin or over until the end of the month. You get the free £10 worth of Bitcoin immediately after purchase! The whole process (including receiving your £100 back in your bank account) should take less than an hour.
The Process
Sign up via my referral link.
Referral link: https://instacoin.uk/ref?code=54C9787
£10 bonus
Non-refferal link: https://instacoin.uk/
No bonus

Steps:

  1. Sign up with the referral link above
  2. Verify your account (driver's licence, passport or gov issued I.D)
  3. Click buy at the top of the dashboard and select BTC, with a purchase amount of £100
  4. Enter the Bitcoin wallet address you want the money paying to.
  5. Pay using by Visa / MasterCard or bank transfer.
  6. You're done! The £100 of BTC will reach your bitcoin wallet usually within 15 minutes or so.
  7. The £10 bonus you receive in the form of a code in your email after the £100 of BTC is sent. Click the email link, enter the code, provide your wallet address again and you'll receive your £10 of BTC for free :)

Once the £110 worth of Bitcoin is in your wallet you are free to do whatever you want with it. I sent mine to my BlockFi account for savings.
You can also get an additional £10 reward for every person you refer up to the end of the month, after this it is £5! Any referral bonuses are given to you at the end of the month).
Let me know if you have any questions.

UPDATE 24.10.20: There is some confusion about the referral amount as being £5 or £10. InstaCoin UK have confirmed That is you sign up with an exsisting customers link (like mine), and complete a £100 purchase before the end of October, you will receive £10 in free Bitcoin credited to your account.
My Referral link for the free £10: https://instacoin.uk/ref?code=54C9787
UPDATE 28.10.20:
Here is a copy of the email I have just received from InstaCoin. I can verify that the mempool is super busy at the moment:

We have received a number of support tickets regarding the delay in BTC confirmations. Rather than reply to everyone individually we would like to address this issue as a whole and give a quick explanation to all our users about why this is occuring:
Sometimes, for a variety of reasons, there will be a spike in the number of BTC transactions that are waiting to be confirmed. That will cause a delay in confirmation times, and increases the price of fees required for a transaction to be included in a block. You can see the current number of unconfirmed transactions here: https://www.blockchain.com/charts/mempool-count?timespan=1week.
Transaction fees directly influence how long you will have to wait for transactions to confirm. At InstaCoin, we broadcast all our transactions with a Regular fee. This fee is covered on our side. It is usually around 0.0001 BTC or £1. Up until the last few days, there has never been an issue with confirmation times.
With a high priority fee, it is likely that transactions will get confirmed quicker by miners. Currently, we are looking at a 0.001BTC/£10 fee to push through transactions at a normal rate. As you can imagine, this is not an expense InstaCoin can cover and we also believe our users would not want to pay this fee either.
We believe the best solution is the one we are currently employing. The delays are frustrating and we feel that frustration too but the current mempool (waiting room) is unprecedented and we will return back to normal ways soon.
The important takeaway we want our users to have from this is that, from our side, the BTC is sent out instantly to your wallet and usually this would get confirmed in a short space of time. At this moment things are taking a bit longer, but the end-point is that you will 100% receive this BTC eventually.

Also remember to complete your sign up and deposist before the end of the month to be certain of getting the free £10 in Bitcoin.
My sign up link again is: https://instacoin.uk/ref?code=54C9787
Sign up code: 54C9787
If you have any questions just let me know.
submitted by TidyCompetition to beermoneyuk [link] [comments]

Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?

This is a follow-up on https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hqzp14/technical_the_path_to_taproot_activation/
Taproot! Everybody wants it!! But... you might ask yourself: sure, everybody else wants it, but why would I, sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, want it? Surely I can be better than everybody else because I swapped XXX fiat for Bitcoin unlike all those nocoiners?
And it is important for you to know the reasons why you, o sovereign Bitcoiner, would want Taproot activated. After all, your nodes (or the nodes your wallets use, which if you are SPV, you hopefully can pester to your wallet vendoimplementor about) need to be upgraded in order for Taproot activation to actually succeed instead of becoming a hot sticky mess.
First, let's consider some principles of Bitcoin.
I'm sure most of us here would agree that the above are very important principles of Bitcoin and that these are principles we would not be willing to remove. If anything, we would want those principles strengthened (especially the last one, financial privacy, which current Bitcoin is only sporadically strong with: you can get privacy, it just requires effort to do so).
So, how does Taproot affect those principles?

Taproot and Your /Coins

Most HODLers probably HODL their coins in singlesig addresses. Sadly, switching to Taproot would do very little for you (it gives a mild discount at spend time, at the cost of a mild increase in fee at receive time (paid by whoever sends to you, so if it's a self-send from a P2PKH or bech32 address, you pay for this); mostly a wash).
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash, so the Taproot output spends 12 bytes more; spending from a P2WPKH requires revealing a 32-byte public key later, which is not needed with Taproot, and Taproot signatures are about 9 bytes smaller than P2WPKH signatures, but the 32 bytes plus 9 bytes is divided by 4 because of the witness discount, so it saves about 11 bytes; mostly a wash, it increases blockweight by about 1 virtual byte, 4 weight for each Taproot-output-input, compared to P2WPKH-output-input).
However, as your HODLings grow in value, you might start wondering if multisignature k-of-n setups might be better for the security of your savings. And it is in multisignature that Taproot starts to give benefits!
Taproot switches to using Schnorr signing scheme. Schnorr makes key aggregation -- constructing a single public key from multiple public keys -- almost as trivial as adding numbers together. "Almost" because it involves some fairly advanced math instead of simple boring number adding, but hey when was the last time you added up your grocery list prices by hand huh?
With current P2SH and P2WSH multisignature schemes, if you have a 2-of-3 setup, then to spend, you need to provide two different signatures from two different public keys. With Taproot, you can create, using special moon math, a single public key that represents your 2-of-3 setup. Then you just put two of your devices together, have them communicate to each other (this can be done airgapped, in theory, by sending QR codes: the software to do this is not even being built yet, but that's because Taproot hasn't activated yet!), and they will make a single signature to authorize any spend from your 2-of-3 address. That's 73 witness bytes -- 18.25 virtual bytes -- of signatures you save!
And if you decide that your current setup with 1-of-1 P2PKH / P2WPKH addresses is just fine as-is: well, that's the whole point of a softfork: backwards-compatibility; you can receive from Taproot users just fine, and once your wallet is updated for Taproot-sending support, you can send to Taproot users just fine as well!
(P2WPKH and P2WSH -- SegWit v0 -- addresses start with bc1q; Taproot -- SegWit v1 --- addresses start with bc1p, in case you wanted to know the difference; in bech32 q is 0, p is 1)
Now how about HODLers who keep all, or some, of their coins on custodial services? Well, any custodial service worth its salt would be doing at least 2-of-3, or probably something even bigger, like 11-of-15. So your custodial service, if it switched to using Taproot internally, could save a lot more (imagine an 11-of-15 getting reduced from 11 signatures to just 1!), which --- we can only hope! --- should translate to lower fees and better customer service from your custodial service!
So I think we can say, very accurately, that the Bitcoin principle --- that YOU are in control of your money --- can only be helped by Taproot (if you are doing multisignature), and, because P2PKH and P2WPKH remain validly-usable addresses in a Taproot future, will not be harmed by Taproot. Its benefit to this principle might be small (it mostly only benefits multisignature users) but since it has no drawbacks with this (i.e. singlesig users can continue to use P2WPKH and P2PKH still) this is still a nice, tidy win!
(even singlesig users get a minor benefit, in that multisig users will now reduce their blockchain space footprint, so that fees can be kept low for everybody; so for example even if you have your single set of private keys engraved on titanium plates sealed in an airtight box stored in a safe buried in a desert protected by angry nomads riding giant sandworms because you're the frickin' Kwisatz Haderach, you still gain some benefit from Taproot)
And here's the important part: if P2PKH/P2WPKH is working perfectly fine with you and you decide to never use Taproot yourself, Taproot will not affect you detrimentally. First do no harm!

Taproot and Your Contracts

No one is an island, no one lives alone. Give and you shall receive. You know: by trading with other people, you can gain expertise in some obscure little necessity of the world (and greatly increase your productivity in that little field), and then trade the products of your expertise for necessities other people have created, all of you thereby gaining gains from trade.
So, contracts, which are basically enforceable agreements that facilitate trading with people who you do not personally know and therefore might not trust.
Let's start with a simple example. You want to buy some gewgaws from somebody. But you don't know them personally. The seller wants the money, you want their gewgaws, but because of the lack of trust (you don't know them!! what if they're scammers??) neither of you can benefit from gains from trade.
However, suppose both of you know of some entity that both of you trust. That entity can act as a trusted escrow. The entity provides you security: this enables the trade, allowing both of you to get gains from trade.
In Bitcoin-land, this can be implemented as a 2-of-3 multisignature. The three signatories in the multisgnature would be you, the gewgaw seller, and the escrow. You put the payment for the gewgaws into this 2-of-3 multisignature address.
Now, suppose it turns out neither of you are scammers (whaaaat!). You receive the gewgaws just fine and you're willing to pay up for them. Then you and the gewgaw seller just sign a transaction --- you and the gewgaw seller are 2, sufficient to trigger the 2-of-3 --- that spends from the 2-of-3 address to a singlesig the gewgaw seller wants (or whatever address the gewgaw seller wants).
But suppose some problem arises. The seller gave you gawgews instead of gewgaws. Or you decided to keep the gewgaws but not sign the transaction to release the funds to the seller. In either case, the escrow is notified, and if it can sign with you to refund the funds back to you (if the seller was a scammer) or it can sign with the seller to forward the funds to the seller (if you were a scammer).
Taproot helps with this: like mentioned above, it allows multisignature setups to produce only one signature, reducing blockchain space usage, and thus making contracts --- which require multiple people, by definition, you don't make contracts with yourself --- is made cheaper (which we hope enables more of these setups to happen for more gains from trade for everyone, also, moon and lambos).
(technology-wise, it's easier to make an n-of-n than a k-of-n, making a k-of-n would require a complex setup involving a long ritual with many communication rounds between the n participants, but an n-of-n can be done trivially with some moon math. You can, however, make what is effectively a 2-of-3 by using a three-branch SCRIPT: either 2-of-2 of you and seller, OR 2-of-2 of you and escrow, OR 2-of-2 of escrow and seller. Fortunately, Taproot adds a facility to embed a SCRIPT inside a public key, so you can have a 2-of-2 Taprooted address (between you and seller) with a SCRIPT branch that can instead be spent with 2-of-2 (you + escrow) OR 2-of-2 (seller + escrow), which implements the three-branched SCRIPT above. If neither of you are scammers (hopefully the common case) then you both sign using your keys and never have to contact the escrow, since you are just using the escrow public key without coordinating with them (because n-of-n is trivial but k-of-n requires setup with communication rounds), so in the "best case" where both of you are honest traders, you also get a privacy boost, in that the escrow never learns you have been trading on gewgaws, I mean ewww, gawgews are much better than gewgaws and therefore I now judge you for being a gewgaw enthusiast, you filthy gewgawer).

Taproot and Your Contracts, Part 2: Cryptographic Boogaloo

Now suppose you want to buy some data instead of things. For example, maybe you have some closed-source software in trial mode installed, and want to pay the developer for the full version. You want to pay for an activation code.
This can be done, today, by using an HTLC. The developer tells you the hash of the activation code. You pay to an HTLC, paying out to the developer if it reveals the preimage (the activation code), or refunding the money back to you after a pre-agreed timeout. If the developer claims the funds, it has to reveal the preimage, which is the activation code, and you can now activate your software. If the developer does not claim the funds by the timeout, you get refunded.
And you can do that, with HTLCs, today.
Of course, HTLCs do have problems:
Fortunately, with Schnorr (which is enabled by Taproot), we can now use the Scriptless Script constuction by Andrew Poelstra. This Scriptless Script allows a new construction, the PTLC or Pointlocked Timelocked Contract. Instead of hashes and preimages, just replace "hash" with "point" and "preimage" with "scalar".
Or as you might know them: "point" is really "public key" and "scalar" is really a "private key". What a PTLC does is that, given a particular public key, the pointlocked branch can be spent only if the spender reveals the private key of the given public key to you.
Another nice thing with PTLCs is that they are deniable. What appears onchain is just a single 2-of-2 signature between you and the developemanufacturer. It's like a magic trick. This signature has no special watermarks, it's a perfectly normal signature (the pledge). However, from this signature, plus some datta given to you by the developemanufacturer (known as the adaptor signature) you can derive the private key of a particular public key you both agree on (the turn). Anyone scraping the blockchain will just see signatures that look just like every other signature, and as long as nobody manages to hack you and get a copy of the adaptor signature or the private key, they cannot get the private key behind the public key (point) that the pointlocked branch needs (the prestige).
(Just to be clear, the public key you are getting the private key from, is distinct from the public key that the developemanufacturer will use for its funds. The activation key is different from the developer's onchain Bitcoin key, and it is the activation key whose private key you will be learning, not the developer's/manufacturer's onchain Bitcoin key).
So:
Taproot lets PTLCs exist onchain because they enable Schnorr, which is a requirement of PTLCs / Scriptless Script.
(technology-wise, take note that Scriptless Script works only for the "pointlocked" branch of the contract; you need normal Script, or a pre-signed nLockTimed transaction, for the "timelocked" branch. Since Taproot can embed a script, you can have the Taproot pubkey be a 2-of-2 to implement the Scriptless Script "pointlocked" branch, then have a hidden script that lets you recover the funds with an OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY after the timeout if the seller does not claim the funds.)

Quantum Quibbles!

Now if you were really paying attention, you might have noticed this parenthetical:
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash...)
So wait, Taproot uses raw 32-byte public keys, and not public key hashes? Isn't that more quantum-vulnerable??
Well, in theory yes. In practice, they probably are not.
It's not that hashes can be broken by quantum computes --- they're still not. Instead, you have to look at how you spend from a P2WPKH/P2PKH pay-to-public-key-hash.
When you spend from a P2PKH / P2WPKH, you have to reveal the public key. Then Bitcoin hashes it and checks if this matches with the public-key-hash, and only then actually validates the signature for that public key.
So an unconfirmed transaction, floating in the mempools of nodes globally, will show, in plain sight for everyone to see, your public key.
(public keys should be public, that's why they're called public keys, LOL)
And if quantum computers are fast enough to be of concern, then they are probably fast enough that, in the several minutes to several hours from broadcast to confirmation, they have already cracked the public key that is openly broadcast with your transaction. The owner of the quantum computer can now replace your unconfirmed transaction with one that pays the funds to itself. Even if you did not opt-in RBF, miners are still incentivized to support RBF on RBF-disabled transactions.
So the extra hash is not as significant a protection against quantum computers as you might think. Instead, the extra hash-and-compare needed is just extra validation effort.
Further, if you have ever, in the past, spent from the address, then there exists already a transaction indelibly stored on the blockchain, openly displaying the public key from which quantum computers can derive the private key. So those are still vulnerable to quantum computers.
For the most part, the cryptographers behind Taproot (and Bitcoin Core) are of the opinion that quantum computers capable of cracking Bitcoin pubkeys are unlikely to appear within a decade or two.
So:
For now, the homomorphic and linear properties of elliptic curve cryptography provide a lot of benefits --- particularly the linearity property is what enables Scriptless Script and simple multisignature (i.e. multisignatures that are just 1 signature onchain). So it might be a good idea to take advantage of them now while we are still fairly safe against quantum computers. It seems likely that quantum-safe signature schemes are nonlinear (thus losing these advantages).

Summary

I Wanna Be The Taprooter!

So, do you want to help activate Taproot? Here's what you, mister sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, can do!

But I Hate Taproot!!

That's fine!

Discussions About Taproot Activation

submitted by almkglor to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Possibly scammed, need any technical advice please! :)

Hi bitcoin!Situation:
I am a professional poker player and ventured deep into the abyss of shady/dodgy sites. Why I did so is still a mystery to me. Long story short, I finally made two withdrawals totaling approximately $3,500 to $4,000 via BTC. Next day, I load up my Ledger and see I have my balance. Awesome!
Oh wait...it's not spendable.Surely it just hasn't confirmed yet, right? No big deal.
Then I look at the transactions...https://blockstream.info/tx/35c1ff29f22c251b67829ce6046a7441aa81dd67d1b6b3fffb3c518fa7a19b2b
andhttps://blockstream.info/tx/e65394e7a7c8fce0eeabef3709368ad032bee7a531fed6ac002823c4ad697970
Previous withdrawals were sent to me with a more normalized fee structure.These were sent with what looks like a near-zero fee.
With my limited technical understanding of BTC, this means the transaction will either get stuck for a VERY long time, or it will never confirm and eventually be returned to him.This person has blocked me on socials and has said on the discord server for the site that "the site is better off without him"
(Basically as a good professional player he didn't want me beating his small community of players)
I'm ok with this as long as I don't get scammed.
Is there anything I can do at this point?

Edit #1: Thanks a ton to u/jcoinner for the extensive help with spending the unspent coins via CPFP (child pays for parent) The transaction appears to be confirmed!
Using CPFP has successfully spent the unconfirmed coins back to a different wallet of mine.
The txid is: 6d65c98ea01bad8d98045794729b7d1b93936a11faad0e3bd126e9223d2ee297
and appears to show a confirm and my coins are spendable.
I believe this persons' intention was
"Send a transaction that's very likely to fail and if it does I'll scam and if it doesn't...oh well."

Thank you so much reddit!

submitted by toast4breakfastSB to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

InstaCoin Payments might be taking longer than usual to appear at present

Here is a copy of the email I have just received from InstaCoin. I can verify that the mempool is super busy at the moment. This means transactions take longer to confirm.
Just wanted to make any users aware that might have signed up recently or be expecting referral bonuses.
For discussion about the Instacoin referral amount reducing from £10 to £5 next month please see my recent post.
Hope everyone that purchased recently is happy wait a couple of extra days to receive their Bitcoin. I am sure it will be worth it, the price has shot up this week which is the reason for the increased mempool activity.

We have received a number of support tickets regarding the delay in BTC confirmations. Rather than reply to everyone individually we would like to address this issue as a whole and give a quick explanation to all our users about why this is occuring:
Sometimes, for a variety of reasons, there will be a spike in the number of BTC transactions that are waiting to be confirmed. That will cause a delay in confirmation times, and increases the price of fees required for a transaction to be included in a block. You can see the current number of unconfirmed transactions here: https://www.blockchain.com/charts/mempool-count?timespan=1week.
Transaction fees directly influence how long you will have to wait for transactions to confirm. At InstaCoin, we broadcast all our transactions with a Regular fee. This fee is covered on our side. It is usually around 0.0001 BTC or £1. Up until the last few days, there has never been an issue with confirmation times.
With a high priority fee, it is likely that transactions will get confirmed quicker by miners. Currently, we are looking at a 0.001BTC/£10 fee to push through transactions at a normal rate. As you can imagine, this is not an expense InstaCoin can cover and we also believe our users would not want to pay this fee either.
We believe the best solution is the one we are currently employing. The delays are frustrating and we feel that frustration too but the current mempool (waiting room) is unprecedented and we will return back to normal ways soon.
The important takeaway we want our users to have from this is that, from our side, the BTC is sent out instantly to your wallet and usually this would get confirmed in a short space of time. At this moment things are taking a bit longer, but the end-point is that you will 100% receive this BTC eventually.
submitted by TidyCompetition to beermoneyuk [link] [comments]

"My transaction is stuck, what to do?" - an explainer [DRAFT]

In the last days we have been experiencing a sharp rise in price, which is historically correlated with many people transacting over the Bitcoin network. Many people transacting over the Bitcoin network implies that the blockspace is in popular demand, meaning that when you send a transaction, it has to compete with other transactions for the inclusion in one of the blocks in the future. Miners are motivated by profits and transactions that pay more than other transactions are preferred when mining a new block. Although the network is working as intended (blockspace is a scarce good, subject to supply/demand dynamics, regulated purely by fees), people who are unfamiliar with it might feel worried that their transaction is “stuck” or otherwise somehow lost or “in limbo”. This post attempts to explain how the mempool works, how to optimize fees and that one does not need to worry about their funds.

TL;DR: Your funds are safe. Just be patient* and it'll be confirmed at some point. A transaction either will be confirmed or it never leaves your wallet, so there is nothing to worry about in regards to the safety of your coins.

You can see how the mempool "ebbs and flows", and lower fee tx's get confirmed in the "ebb" times (weekends, nights): https://jochen-hoenicke.de/queue/#0,30d
* if you are in hurry there are things like RBF (Replace By Fee) and CPFC (Child Pays For Parent), which you can use to boost your transaction fees; you will need an advanced wallet like Bitcoin Core or Electrum for that though. Keep also in mind that this is not possible with any transaction (RBF requires opt in before sending, f.ex). If nothing else works and your transaction really needs a soon confirmation, you can try and contact a mining pool to ask them if they would include your transaction. Some mining pools even offer a web-interface for this: 1, 2.
Here’s how Andreas Antonopoulos describes it:
In bitcoin there is no "in transit". Transactions are atomic meaning they either happen all at once or don't happen at all. There is no situation where they "leave" one wallet and are not simultaneously and instantaneously in the destination address. Either the transaction happened or it didn't. The only time you can't see the funds is if your wallet is hiding them because it is tracking a pending transaction and doesn't want you to try and spend funds that are already being spent in another transaction. It doesn't mean the money is in limbo, it's just your wallet waiting to see the outcome. If that is the case, you just wait. Eventually the transaction will either happen or will be deleted by the network.
tl;dr: your funds are safe

How is the speed of confirmations determined in bitcoin?

Open this site: https://jochen-hoenicke.de/queue/#0,2w
Here you see how many transactions are currently (and were historically) waiting to be confirmed, i.e how many transactions are currently competing with your transaction for blockspace (=confirmation).
You can see two important things: the differently coloured layers, each layer representing a different fee (higher layer = higher fees). You can point at a layer and see which fees (expressed in sat/byte) are represented in this layer. You can then deduct which layer your own transaction is currently at, and how far away from the top your position is (miners work through the mempool always from the top, simply because the tx's on top pay them more). You can estimate that each newly mined block removes roughly 1.xMB from the top (see the third graph which shows the mempool size in MB). On average, a new block is produced every ten minutes. But keep in mind that over time more transactions come into the mempool, so there can be periods where transactions are coming faster than transactions being “processed” by miners.
The second important observation is that the mempool "ebbs and flows", so even the lower paid transactions are periodically being confirmed at some point.
In short: what determines the speed of a confirmation is A) how high you set the fees (in sat/byte), B) how many other transactions with same or higher fees are currently competing with yours and C) how many transactions with higher paid fees will be broadcast after yours.
A) you can influence directly, B) you can observe in real time, but C) is difficult to predict. So it's always a little tricky to tell when the first confirmation happens if you set your fees low. But it's quite certain that at some point even the cheap transactions will come through.

So what happens if my transaction stays unconfirmed for days or even weeks?

Transactions are being broadcast by the full nodes on the network. Each node can adjust their settings for how long they keep unconfirmed transactions in their mempool. That’s why there is not a fixed amount of time after which a transaction is dropped from the mempool, but most nodes drop unconfirmed tx’s after two weeks [IS THIS CORRECT?]. This means that in the absolute worst case the unconfirmed transaction will simply disappear from the network, as if it never happened. Keep in mind that in those two weeks the coins never actually leave your wallet. It’s just that your wallet doesn’t show them as “available”, but you still have options like RBF and CPFP to get your transaction confirmed with higher fees, or to “cancel” your transaction by spending the same coins onto another address with a higher fee.

Helpful tools to estimate fees for future transactions:

Here are some resources that can help you estimate fees when sending a bitcoin transaction, so you don't end up overpaying (or underpaying) unnecessarily. Keep in mind that in order to take advantage of this, you need a proper bitcoin wallet which allows for custom fee setting. A selection of such wallets you can find here or here.
The order here is roughly from advanced to easy.
1) https://jochen-hoenicke.de/queue/#0,24h
Here you can see a visualization of how many unconfirmed transactions are currently on the network, as well as how many were there in the past. Each coloured layer represents a different fee amount. F.ex the deep blue (lowest layer) are the 1sat/byte transactions, slightly brighter level above are the 2sat/byte transactions and so on.
The most interesting graph is the third one, which shows you the size of the current mempool in MB and the amount of transactions with different fee levels, which would compete with your transaction if you were to send it right now. This should help you estimating how high you need to set the fee (in sat/byte) in order to have it confirmed "soon". But this also should help you to see that even the 1sat/byte transactions get confirmed very regularly, especially on weekends and in the night periods, and that the spikes in the mempool are always temporary. For that you can switch to higher timeframes in the upper right corner, f.ex here is a 30 days view: https://jochen-hoenicke.de/queue/#0,30d. You clearly can see that the mempool is cyclical and you can set a very low fee if you are not in hurry.
2) https://mempool.space
This is also an overview of the current mempool status, although less visual than the previous one. It shows you some important stats, like the mempool size, some basic stats of the recent blocks (tx fees, size etc). Most importantly, it makes a projection of how large you need to set your fees in sat/byte if you want your transaction to be included in the next block, or within the next two/three/four blocks. You can see this projection in the left upper corner (the blocks coloured in brown).
3) https://whatthefee.io
This is a simple estimation tool. It shows you the likelihood (in %) of a particular fee size (in sat/byte) to be confirmed within a particular timeframe (measured in hours). It is very simple to use, but the disadvantage is that it shows you estimates only for the next 24 hours. You probably will overpay by this method if your transaction is less time sensitive than that.
4) https://twitter.com/CoreFeeHelper
This is a very simple bot that tweets out fees projections every hour or so. It tells you how you need to set the fees in order to be confirmed within 1hou6hours/12hours/1day/3days/1week. Very simple to use.
Hopefully one of these tools will help you save fees for your next bitcoin transaction. Or at least help you understand that even with a very low fee setting your transaction will be confirmed sooner or later. Furthermore, I hope it makes you understand how important it is to use a wallet that allows you to set your own fees.
submitted by TheGreatMuffin to u/TheGreatMuffin [link] [comments]

BTC withdrawal unconfirmed but not in mempool

My BTC withdrawal is still unconfirmed for 5 hours now, there is txt hash in the app but not in mempool or not found in blockchain.
Anyone having or encountered the same issue?
Update 1: A day passed the txt hash is still unconfirmed, no answer from my 2 support tickets. In case someone from Celsius read this, my support ticket# 183910 and 183914
Update 2: I received an email from support
There is a lot of traffic on the BTC network so that is why withdrawals are slower than usual. Pleases note that because of the high traffic transactions are a bit slower and we are doing everything that we can to speed things up on our end and everything will be in order soon and you will receive the coins.
Update 3: 3 days passed still no Bitcoin in my account, I sent them follow up email about this, I will update tomorrow.
Update 4: I received an email from support that they forwarded the issue to the Dev team to investigate.
Update 5: 2 days passed since the last support replied email and 6 days passed since problem occured. I sent them another follow up email regarding this issue.
Update 6: I received an email from support that they still haven't received a reply from the Dev team regarding this issue.
Update 7: Received a new email said there was network error and my BTC is now back to my wallet. I initiate new withdrawal and success, issue is now resolved. Thank you :)
submitted by joele_ to CelsiusNetwork [link] [comments]

[ Bitcoin ] Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?

Topic originally posted in Bitcoin by almkglor [link]
This is a follow-up on https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hqzp14/technical_the_path_to_taproot_activation/
Taproot! Everybody wants it!! But... you might ask yourself: sure, everybody else wants it, but why would I, sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, want it? Surely I can be better than everybody else because I swapped XXX fiat for Bitcoin unlike all those nocoiners?
And it is important for you to know the reasons why you, o sovereign Bitcoiner, would want Taproot activated. After all, your nodes (or the nodes your wallets use, which if you are SPV, you hopefully can pester to your wallet vendoimplementor about) need to be upgraded in order for Taproot activation to actually succeed instead of becoming a hot sticky mess.
First, let's consider some principles of Bitcoin.
I'm sure most of us here would agree that the above are very important principles of Bitcoin and that these are principles we would not be willing to remove. If anything, we would want those principles strengthened (especially the last one, financial privacy, which current Bitcoin is only sporadically strong with: you can get privacy, it just requires effort to do so).
So, how does Taproot affect those principles?

Taproot and Your /Coins

Most HODLers probably HODL their coins in singlesig addresses. Sadly, switching to Taproot would do very little for you (it gives a mild discount at spend time, at the cost of a mild increase in fee at receive time (paid by whoever sends to you, so if it's a self-send from a P2PKH or bech32 address, you pay for this); mostly a wash).
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash, so the Taproot output spends 12 bytes more; spending from a P2WPKH requires revealing a 32-byte public key later, which is not needed with Taproot, and Taproot signatures are about 9 bytes smaller than P2WPKH signatures, but the 32 bytes plus 9 bytes is divided by 4 because of the witness discount, so it saves about 11 bytes; mostly a wash, it increases blockweight by about 1 virtual byte, 4 weight for each Taproot-output-input, compared to P2WPKH-output-input).
However, as your HODLings grow in value, you might start wondering if multisignature k-of-n setups might be better for the security of your savings. And it is in multisignature that Taproot starts to give benefits!
Taproot switches to using Schnorr signing scheme. Schnorr makes key aggregation -- constructing a single public key from multiple public keys -- almost as trivial as adding numbers together. "Almost" because it involves some fairly advanced math instead of simple boring number adding, but hey when was the last time you added up your grocery list prices by hand huh?
With current P2SH and P2WSH multisignature schemes, if you have a 2-of-3 setup, then to spend, you need to provide two different signatures from two different public keys. With Taproot, you can create, using special moon math, a single public key that represents your 2-of-3 setup. Then you just put two of your devices together, have them communicate to each other (this can be done airgapped, in theory, by sending QR codes: the software to do this is not even being built yet, but that's because Taproot hasn't activated yet!), and they will make a single signature to authorize any spend from your 2-of-3 address. That's 73 witness bytes -- 18.25 virtual bytes -- of signatures you save!
And if you decide that your current setup with 1-of-1 P2PKH / P2WPKH addresses is just fine as-is: well, that's the whole point of a softfork: backwards-compatibility; you can receive from Taproot users just fine, and once your wallet is updated for Taproot-sending support, you can send to Taproot users just fine as well!
(P2WPKH and P2WSH -- SegWit v0 -- addresses start with bc1q; Taproot -- SegWit v1 --- addresses start with bc1p, in case you wanted to know the difference; in bech32 q is 0, p is 1)
Now how about HODLers who keep all, or some, of their coins on custodial services? Well, any custodial service worth its salt would be doing at least 2-of-3, or probably something even bigger, like 11-of-15. So your custodial service, if it switched to using Taproot internally, could save a lot more (imagine an 11-of-15 getting reduced from 11 signatures to just 1!), which --- we can only hope! --- should translate to lower fees and better customer service from your custodial service!
So I think we can say, very accurately, that the Bitcoin principle --- that YOU are in control of your money --- can only be helped by Taproot (if you are doing multisignature), and, because P2PKH and P2WPKH remain validly-usable addresses in a Taproot future, will not be harmed by Taproot. Its benefit to this principle might be small (it mostly only benefits multisignature users) but since it has no drawbacks with this (i.e. singlesig users can continue to use P2WPKH and P2PKH still) this is still a nice, tidy win!
(even singlesig users get a minor benefit, in that multisig users will now reduce their blockchain space footprint, so that fees can be kept low for everybody; so for example even if you have your single set of private keys engraved on titanium plates sealed in an airtight box stored in a safe buried in a desert protected by angry nomads riding giant sandworms because you're the frickin' Kwisatz Haderach, you still gain some benefit from Taproot)
And here's the important part: if P2PKH/P2WPKH is working perfectly fine with you and you decide to never use Taproot yourself, Taproot will not affect you detrimentally. First do no harm!

Taproot and Your Contracts

No one is an island, no one lives alone. Give and you shall receive. You know: by trading with other people, you can gain expertise in some obscure little necessity of the world (and greatly increase your productivity in that little field), and then trade the products of your expertise for necessities other people have created, all of you thereby gaining gains from trade.
So, contracts, which are basically enforceable agreements that facilitate trading with people who you do not personally know and therefore might not trust.
Let's start with a simple example. You want to buy some gewgaws from somebody. But you don't know them personally. The seller wants the money, you want their gewgaws, but because of the lack of trust (you don't know them!! what if they're scammers??) neither of you can benefit from gains from trade.
However, suppose both of you know of some entity that both of you trust. That entity can act as a trusted escrow. The entity provides you security: this enables the trade, allowing both of you to get gains from trade.
In Bitcoin-land, this can be implemented as a 2-of-3 multisignature. The three signatories in the multisgnature would be you, the gewgaw seller, and the escrow. You put the payment for the gewgaws into this 2-of-3 multisignature address.
Now, suppose it turns out neither of you are scammers (whaaaat!). You receive the gewgaws just fine and you're willing to pay up for them. Then you and the gewgaw seller just sign a transaction --- you and the gewgaw seller are 2, sufficient to trigger the 2-of-3 --- that spends from the 2-of-3 address to a singlesig the gewgaw seller wants (or whatever address the gewgaw seller wants).
But suppose some problem arises. The seller gave you gawgews instead of gewgaws. Or you decided to keep the gewgaws but not sign the transaction to release the funds to the seller. In either case, the escrow is notified, and if it can sign with you to refund the funds back to you (if the seller was a scammer) or it can sign with the seller to forward the funds to the seller (if you were a scammer).
Taproot helps with this: like mentioned above, it allows multisignature setups to produce only one signature, reducing blockchain space usage, and thus making contracts --- which require multiple people, by definition, you don't make contracts with yourself --- is made cheaper (which we hope enables more of these setups to happen for more gains from trade for everyone, also, moon and lambos).
(technology-wise, it's easier to make an n-of-n than a k-of-n, making a k-of-n would require a complex setup involving a long ritual with many communication rounds between the n participants, but an n-of-n can be done trivially with some moon math. You can, however, make what is effectively a 2-of-3 by using a three-branch SCRIPT: either 2-of-2 of you and seller, OR 2-of-2 of you and escrow, OR 2-of-2 of escrow and seller. Fortunately, Taproot adds a facility to embed a SCRIPT inside a public key, so you can have a 2-of-2 Taprooted address (between you and seller) with a SCRIPT branch that can instead be spent with 2-of-2 (you + escrow) OR 2-of-2 (seller + escrow), which implements the three-branched SCRIPT above. If neither of you are scammers (hopefully the common case) then you both sign using your keys and never have to contact the escrow, since you are just using the escrow public key without coordinating with them (because n-of-n is trivial but k-of-n requires setup with communication rounds), so in the "best case" where both of you are honest traders, you also get a privacy boost, in that the escrow never learns you have been trading on gewgaws, I mean ewww, gawgews are much better than gewgaws and therefore I now judge you for being a gewgaw enthusiast, you filthy gewgawer).

Taproot and Your Contracts, Part 2: Cryptographic Boogaloo

Now suppose you want to buy some data instead of things. For example, maybe you have some closed-source software in trial mode installed, and want to pay the developer for the full version. You want to pay for an activation code.
This can be done, today, by using an HTLC. The developer tells you the hash of the activation code. You pay to an HTLC, paying out to the developer if it reveals the preimage (the activation code), or refunding the money back to you after a pre-agreed timeout. If the developer claims the funds, it has to reveal the preimage, which is the activation code, and you can now activate your software. If the developer does not claim the funds by the timeout, you get refunded.
And you can do that, with HTLCs, today.
Of course, HTLCs do have problems:
Fortunately, with Schnorr (which is enabled by Taproot), we can now use the Scriptless Script constuction by Andrew Poelstra. This Scriptless Script allows a new construction, the PTLC or Pointlocked Timelocked Contract. Instead of hashes and preimages, just replace "hash" with "point" and "preimage" with "scalar".
Or as you might know them: "point" is really "public key" and "scalar" is really a "private key". What a PTLC does is that, given a particular public key, the pointlocked branch can be spent only if the spender reveals the private key of the given private key to you.
Another nice thing with PTLCs is that they are deniable. What appears onchain is just a single 2-of-2 signature between you and the developemanufacturer. It's like a magic trick. This signature has no special watermarks, it's a perfectly normal signature (the pledge). However, from this signature, plus some datta given to you by the developemanufacturer (known as the adaptor signature) you can derive the private key of a particular public key you both agree on (the turn). Anyone scraping the blockchain will just see signatures that look just like every other signature, and as long as nobody manages to hack you and get a copy of the adaptor signature or the private key, they cannot get the private key behind the public key (point) that the pointlocked branch needs (the prestige).
(Just to be clear, the public key you are getting the private key from, is distinct from the public key that the developemanufacturer will use for its funds. The activation key is different from the developer's onchain Bitcoin key, and it is the activation key whose private key you will be learning, not the developer's/manufacturer's onchain Bitcoin key).
So:
Taproot lets PTLCs exist onchain because they enable Schnorr, which is a requirement of PTLCs / Scriptless Script.
(technology-wise, take note that Scriptless Script works only for the "pointlocked" branch of the contract; you need normal Script, or a pre-signed nLockTimed transaction, for the "timelocked" branch. Since Taproot can embed a script, you can have the Taproot pubkey be a 2-of-2 to implement the Scriptless Script "pointlocked" branch, then have a hidden script that lets you recover the funds with an OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY after the timeout if the seller does not claim the funds.)

Quantum Quibbles!

Now if you were really paying attention, you might have noticed this parenthetical:
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash...)
So wait, Taproot uses raw 32-byte public keys, and not public key hashes? Isn't that more quantum-vulnerable??
Well, in theory yes. In practice, they probably are not.
It's not that hashes can be broken by quantum computes --- they're still not. Instead, you have to look at how you spend from a P2WPKH/P2PKH pay-to-public-key-hash.
When you spend from a P2PKH / P2WPKH, you have to reveal the public key. Then Bitcoin hashes it and checks if this matches with the public-key-hash, and only then actually validates the signature for that public key.
So an unconfirmed transaction, floating in the mempools of nodes globally, will show, in plain sight for everyone to see, your public key.
(public keys should be public, that's why they're called public keys, LOL)
And if quantum computers are fast enough to be of concern, then they are probably fast enough that, in the several minutes to several hours from broadcast to confirmation, they have already cracked the public key that is openly broadcast with your transaction. The owner of the quantum computer can now replace your unconfirmed transaction with one that pays the funds to itself. Even if you did not opt-in RBF, miners are still incentivized to support RBF on RBF-disabled transactions.
So the extra hash is not as significant a protection against quantum computers as you might think. Instead, the extra hash-and-compare needed is just extra validation effort.
Further, if you have ever, in the past, spent from the address, then there exists already a transaction indelibly stored on the blockchain, openly displaying the public key from which quantum computers can derive the private key. So those are still vulnerable to quantum computers.
For the most part, the cryptographers behind Taproot (and Bitcoin Core) are of the opinion that quantum computers capable of cracking Bitcoin pubkeys are unlikely to appear within a decade or two.
So:
For now, the homomorphic and linear properties of elliptic curve cryptography provide a lot of benefits --- particularly the linearity property is what enables Scriptless Script and simple multisignature (i.e. multisignatures that are just 1 signature onchain). So it might be a good idea to take advantage of them now while we are still fairly safe against quantum computers. It seems likely that quantum-safe signature schemes are nonlinear (thus losing these advantages).

Summary

I Wanna Be The Taprooter!

So, do you want to help activate Taproot? Here's what you, mister sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, can do!

But I Hate Taproot!!

That's fine!

Discussions About Taproot Activation

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submitted by anticensor_bot to u/anticensor_bot [link] [comments]

TREZOR Transaction Fee Confusion??

Okay so I was testing out the transaction fees to send some bitcoin from my Trezor....
I noticed, if I want to send like .08 or even .8 btc the transaction fees are high and increase according to a higher btc amount. For example .08btc = $3.40 tx fee or .8btc = $40 tx fee. (these are just hypothetical numbers )
Now if i wanted to send any amount over 1btc, the transaction fee for high speed on Trezor drop significantly to around just $1.50, in effect, just way LOWER. I also get a warning sign from Trezor saying be careful that I am sending a very large amount of bitcoin.
Is this some kind of glitch? Why would transaction fees decrease so drastically if you send an amount greater than 1btc?
wouldn't the fee increase as it normally does as you increase btc amount? Is there some kind of special thing that all 1btc< amounts get pegged to a lower transaction fee?
So confused, please help. Don't want to send large amount of bitcoin and sit unconfirmed because i put in too small fee. thank you
submitted by bitdentist to TREZOR [link] [comments]

why is my bitcoin transaction unconfirmed (why is bitcoin so slow)? Bitcoin, The Blockchain and Unconfirmed Transactions What to Do if Your Bitcoin Transaction Gets How to accelerate Blockchain unconfirmed transactions ... Why is my BTC transaction unconfirmed? #Bitcoin, #BTC, #Blockchain

Every bitcoin transaction that's sent flows into what's called the mempool (short for memory pool) before it can be confirmed by miners. When there's a dramatic spike in transaction activity, the mempool can become congested because so many transactions are waiting to be included in the next block. Bitcoin users across the network may notice their transactions sit as unconfirmed or pending for ... Once the transaction is verified it then “waits” inside the Mempool (i.e. in some sort of a “limbo” state). It’s basically waiting to be picked up by a Bitcoin miner and entered into a block of transaction on the Blockchain. Until it is picked up it’s considered an “unconfirmed transaction” or a “pending transaction”. A new ... Why Bitcoin Transactions Remain Unconfirmed. An unconfirmed bitcoin transaction occurs when a given transaction fails to receive a confirmation on the blockchain within 24 hours. All bitcoin transactions must be confirmed by miners. They need a minimum of three confirmations to be considered fully confirmed. There are two main reasons your bitcoin transaction may end up remaining unconfirmed ... My transaction is not confirmed yet. If the transaction receives a confirmation, your wallet should update automatically. If the transaction does not confirm, the funds will be spendable again from the sender's wallet. This may take up to 30 days. My transaction is confirmed but is not showing up in my wallet. Why is my crypto transaction 'unconfirmed'? Region: Europe . An unconfirmed transaction means that the transaction has not been included in a block and thus has not been completed. Most recipients require at least one confirmation to complete the transaction, including Wirex. Common reasons for unconfirmed transactions are: You have just made the transfer. The network needs at least 10 minutes ...

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why is my bitcoin transaction unconfirmed (why is bitcoin so slow)?

What to Do if Your Bitcoin Transaction Gets "Stuck"...Unconfirmed. Accelerate your transaction using the methods in this video. *****... At press time, the Bitcoin network is currently facing a backlog of over 135,000 unconfirmed transactions and fees have soared. This comes days after the proponents of the SegWit2x scaling ... Get your blockchain pending transactions confirmed fast This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue Today Your Blockchain Transaction Pending, Unconfirmed Why? You Must know why Your Blockchain Txn is Not Verified, Pending , know Reason Behind it.

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